Amazon.co.uk Widgets Blog - Emma the Gardener

Gum arabic under the microscope

View/leave comments



In this video from the University of Cambridge, Rox Middleton shows us a ‘nanoscale’ image of gum arabic, taken with an electron microscope. Gum arabic is the hardened sap of an Acacia tree; this sample was probably collected in Sudan. If you want to see what it looks like on the everyday scale, I took a photo of a chunk when I visited the Oxford University herbarium. Gum arabic is a food additive, E414, used as a stabiliser. It’s also used in paints and pigments.

Posted in Blog on Jul 16, 2014 ·

Last modified on Jul 9, 2014

Tag: science

Mintylicious

View/leave comments

SEM mint image

This isn’t a fantasy alien landscape, its an image of a mint leaf, taken with a scanning electron microscope by Annie Cavanagh. This low-res version is available from Wellcome Images with a Creative Commons license, which allows me to show you how awesome plants are. The spike is a trichome (a hair, essentially). The blobs are oil, sitting on oil glands, and are what gives mint is delicious flavour. The oval structures that look a bit like seeds scattered on the surface, are stomata, the holes that the plant can open and close to regulate its intake of carbon dioxide and the expulsion of oxygen. You can just see the slits along the centre, which is where they would open up.

Posted in Blog on Jul 12, 2014 ·

Tags: science & herbs.

Daisy trick

View/leave comments



In this video from Cambridge University, Dr Beverley Glover uses a Scanning Electron Micrograph to explain the ‘trick’ that makes daisy-family plants more attractive to pollinating insects.

Posted in Blog on Jul 9, 2014 ·

Last modified on Jul 9, 2014

Tags: flowers & science.

Space lettuce!

View/leave comments (1 so far)




As I mentioned a few weeks ago, NASA astronaut Steve Swanson has been doing some gardening on the International Space Station, growing ‘Outredgeous’ red romaine lettuce in the new VEGGIE gardening system. This inaugural experiment, called Veg-01, is partly a test of the hardware and partly to see whether space-grown crops will be safe to eat. After all his hard work, Steve doesn’t get to eat his lettuce – it has to be returned to Earth for testing. If the lettuce is proved safe, a second batch of lettuce can be grown and eaten later in the year. This would be the first mouthful of ‘homegrown’ food to be consumed in space, and NASA have produced a great video explaining the VEGGIE project:

Posted in Blog on Jun 11, 2014 ·

Last modified on Jun 11, 2014

Tags: science & space.

Hands-on gardening on the ISS

View comments (2)

Tending to the Veggie garden on the ISS

Astronaut Steven Swanson tending to the Veggie garden on the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA

If you’re currently tending lettuce plants, then you have something in common with the crew on board the International Space Station (ISS). They’re testing NASA’s new Vegetable Production System – affectionately known as ‘Veggie’. At 11.5 inches by 14.5 inches, Veggie is the largest plant growth chamber to have been blasted into space, and was developed by Orbital Technologies Corp.

Veggie was delivered to the ISS onboard the dragon capsule of SpaceX-3 in April, and installed in the Columbus module at the beginning of May. It has red and blue LEDs to supply the plants with the light they need for growth; it also has green LEDs that the astronauts can turn on to give white illumination, so that the plants don’t look funny colours.

Veggie’s first experiment, Veg-01, is mainly a hardware validation test to check everything is working properly. It has been ‘planted’ with six ‘pillows’ – each one contains the growing medium, a controlled-release fertiliser and calcined clay to improve aeration and plant growth. Water is supplied via a root mat, and wicks for the plants (which also help ensure they grow the right way up in microgravity!).

Veg-01 will be growing ‘Outredgeous’ romaine lettuce, a very red lettuce that will be familiar to US gardeners (I don’t think it’s available in the UK). An astronaut will thin the seedlings down to one plant per pillow, and the experiment lasts for 28 days. Photos will be taken each week, and microbial samples will be taken as well. At the end of the 28 days, the lettuce will be harvested and frozen and stored until it can be returned to Earth on SpaceX-4 in August.

The lettuce harvest will be analysed on Earth to ensure that it’s safe to eat. If so then a second set of pillows can be started on the ISS, with the crew able to tuck into homegrown lettuce 28 days later. While they’re waiting to hear whether Veggie produces edible plants, they have some pillows sown with ‘Profusion’ Zinnias to brighten the place up.

As well as proving that edible vegetables can be produced in space, and that the Veggie system works, it is hoped that the astronauts will enjoy tending their garden – which will also make it easier for them to mark the passage of time. A source of fresh food would also be very welcome – fresh produce is eaten almost as soon as it arrives in every cargo run, leaving long-life rations to provide the bulk of astronaut cuisine.

Crops growing in VEGGIE plant pillows

Crops tested in VEGGIE plant pillows include lettuce, Swiss chard, radishes, Chinese cabbage and peas. Image credit: NASA

A control experiment is taking place on Earth, so that proper plant science can be done with Veggie’s results. An Earth-bound Veggie has already grown a range of crops – including lettuce, Swiss chard, radishes, Chinese cabbage and peas.

Have you grown Outredgeous lettuce? Is is a variety worthy of being grown in space?



I am submitting this to VP’s Show of Hands Chelsea Fringe project, although I think she might have trouble marking these gardening hands on her map ;)

If you’d like to know more about how humans carry useful plants across the world (and beyond it!) then check out my latest book – Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs – which includes a potted history of plant hunting as well as interviews with gardeners trying to grow edible plants outside of their native habitat.

Posted in Blog on May 22, 2014 ·

Last modified on Jun 11, 2014

Tags: space & science.

Gardens on Mars: HI-SEAS 2

View comments (2)

Mars/Hawaii

Mars in Hawaii. Credit: HI-SEAS

In Jade Pearls and Alien Eyeballs I talk about the journeys plants have made with us – criss-crossing the globe and leaving Earth entirely for missions in space. I talk about it a little bit more in the latest episode of the Alternative Kitchen Garden Show – Plants in Space.

One of the missions I mention in the show is going on right now. There are currently 6 scientists living in a habitat dome 11 metres in diameter. They can only go outside if they’re wearing a space suit, they have strict water-saving regimes that allow them only 12 minutes under the shower each week and some of their meals are dehydrated astronaut rations. But these scientists aren’t astronauts; they’re part of a Mars simulation project, HI-SEAS 2, and they haven’t been blasted into space. They’re spending the next four months on the side of a mountain in Hawaii.

One of the scientists, Lucie Poulet, is researching three different sets of LED lights that could be used to grow food in inhospitable environments. She’ll be looking at which lights provide the greatest efficiency, and how much time a crew might need to spend tending their plants. But it’s hoped that the presence of the plants might also help to foster a sense of well-being – the psychological effects of greenery are under the spotlight as well.

Astronauts on long term space missions, such as a trip to Mars, would need to be able to grow some of their own food – but it’s still unclear how feasible that will be. There are numerous obstacles to overcome, and questions to answer. How will the plants be affected by different gravity? How do you keep them watered whilst avoiding leaks that put delicate equipment at risk? Will the harvested produce be safe to eat without washing? Or safe to eat full stop…?

Gardens in space are likely to be a far cry from the bountiful ‘hanging gardens’ seen in sci-fi movies – space and weight are at a premium, and the plants have to give a good return on the investment. Lucie Poulet will be growing lettuce, radishes and tomatoes in her little corner of ‘Mars’.

It’s the space-age equivalent of asking what you’d take to a desert island, but which crop would you want to take with you on a space mission?

Posted in Blog on May 19, 2014 ·

Last modified on Jun 11, 2014

Tags: science & space.

The Aroma of Rain

View comments

Given the showery weather we’ve been having recently I thought you might like this lovely infographic from Compound Interest, which examines the chemicals behind ‘petrichor’, the distinctive smell of rain or wet ground :)

(Click through to the original image if you want to see it larger!)

Posted in Blog on May 15, 2014 ·

Tag: science

Ethnomineralogy

View comments (4)

Parax paper

Ryan went to the Gadget Show last week, and brought me back a present. He bought me three notebooks made from Parax Paper, which (according to the label) is made from stone. He knew I’d be intrigued, and I had to investigate. It turns out that Parax paper is tree-free, made from calcium carbonate (the active ingredient in agricultural lime, and the stuff that makes water hard) and some plastic (HDPE). Its manufacture doesn’t use any water, requires less energy than conventional paper, and the finish is naturally white. It has a lovely, smooth writing surface and can be recycled (as plastic, not paper). It has won all kinds of eco awards.

Parax paper is water-resistant, and hard (but not impossible) to tear, which should make it an ideal allotment notebook. It won’t mind being used in the rain. In theory, I could write on it underwater, if I had a pen that would write underwater. As the paper doesn’t yellow over time, it could be good for archiving. I will give it a go. If you fancy trying Parax paper for yourself, Amazon is one possible retailer as they have a good selection.

Stone Ice Cubes

Parax paper isn’t the only stone product to have come into my life recently. We have also acquired some whisky rocks, designed to cool your drink without watering it down. Of course, they can be used with anything, not just whisky. Ours are made from soapstone (they’re Chill ‘N Rock, which we ordered from Amazon). You pop them in the freezer, and then into your drinks as necessary. A quick wash and dry and then they can go back into the freezer for next time.

Now, I’m an ethnobotanist, interested in the way people make use of plants. And occasionally I stray into ethnobiology (mainly due to an interest in edible insects, entomophagy), the way people make use of animal products. And I my stone implements set me wondering – is there such a thing as ethnomineralogy? It turns out that there is, it’s the “study of the interrelationships between people and the minerals, or inorganic resources, in their environment”. So, whether you’re in to the animal, vegetable or mineral, there’s an anthropologist out there who wants to know about it!

Posted in Blog on Apr 14, 2014 ·

Last modified on Apr 25, 2014

Tag: science

2014: Citizen Science

View comments (1)

Horse chestnut candle

Towards the end of last month, citizen science made the news when the findings of the Conker Tree Science Project were published (e.g. by BBC News). The project used reports from the public to track the spread and establishment of the horse chestnut leaf miner across the UK (pretty much everywhere south of Newcastle). The findings have been published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, as befits proper science (as The Success of the Horse-Chestnut Leaf-Miner, Cameraria ohridella, in the UK Revealed with Hypothesis-Led Citizen Science).

The growth of social media and the development of internet tools to handle these kinds of projects means that there are now more options for the citizen scientist than ever before, and the properly-published results show that citizen scientists are making a real contribution. So if you’d like to try your hand, here are some of the projects you might like to get involved with:

The Harlequin Ladybird Survey is tracking the spread of another invasive pest, one that has the potential to out-compete our native ladybird species.

OPAL is the Open Air Laboratories Network, which aims to “create and inspire a new generation of nature-lovers by getting people to explore, study, enjoy and protect their local environment”. Their website shows that they have quite a few surveys open at the moment, including tree health, biodiversity and soil and earthworms.

The Zooniverse is a big citizen science site with lots of projects. They started out with Galaxy Zoo, using pictures from the Hubble Telescope to investigate how galaxies form. They’ve added in several more astronomy projects, including looking at solar flares and exploring Mars’ weather, but they’ve expanded into other areas of science as well. You could look through historic ship’s logs, to find information that can be used to develop climate models, or classify NOAA’s more modern data on tropical cyclones. Study the lives of the ancient Greeks, or annotate and tag soldiers’ diaries from the first world war.

For the citizen naturalist, Zooniverse has options to listen to whales communicating, classify the Serengeti animals photographed by camera traps or explore the ocean floor. There are museum samples that need transcribing for historical biodiversity data – including herbarium samples in Notes from Nature.

That’s not the only option if you like looking through old herbarium records – Herbarium@Home could use your help with that as well.

Green-fingered gardeners can take part in Garden Organic’s Members Experiments (although there’s a clue in the name – you do have to be a GO member). There’s usually several to choose from each year. Previous ones that I know about include growing chickpeas, mango ginger and soy beans here in the UK, and finding out which flowers attract beneficial insects into the garden.

There are bound to be more projects that I don’t know about, and I’m sure there are some great local efforts as well – if you’re involved in a citizen science project then do let me know in the comments. Whether you get involved because it’s a cause you want to support, or because you have some spare time to donate, or because you just #lovescience and want to be a part of it, there’s plenty to choose from, and citizen science can be really rewarding!

Posted in Blog on Feb 14, 2014 ·

Last modified on Apr 29, 2014

Tags: science & ethnobotany.

Access to Research

View comments (3)

Private

When you’re a university student, you have access to all kinds of academic research, provided via your institution’s library. They pay for access to any of the journals that are deemed relevant for students and academic staff. Once you leave, you are brutally cut off, left high and dry above the flood of knowledge, both modern and historical.

Open access to online papers is increasing, and I’m not going to dwell on the politics/ business model of academic publishing, but suffice to say that – as an individual – access to most journals is a costly business. You can buy/rent one-off access to papers, but a subscription is probably more than most people can afford. And since interesting research is spread (whatever your field) over innumerable journals, it would be impossible to fund a research habit yourself. (For plant nerds, an annual subscription to Economic Botany is actually affordable, and comes with online access to their archive, which makes it a very good deal.) Quite often you can’t read more than the abstract without paying – which may not be enough to tell you that the paper will be useful to you.

There are numerous ways around this problem, which are laid out in a nice blog post – 5 Ways To Get Your Hands On Academic Papers Without Losing Your Mind (And Money). It talks about asking for papers on Twitter, Microsoft Academic Search, Google Scholar, Cite Seer X and emaiiing the author (most academics are only to happy to send copies to you if you are genuinely interested in their research).

I added a sixth to the list, which I was told about but have yet to try – asking on Reddit Scholar. You may also find that the author(s) have a list of publications somewhere on the internet, some of which may well have links to downloadable copies. However, some of the journals dislike copies being given away for free, and ask institutions to remove them.

But, as of last week, you can now get access to research journals via your local public library, thanks to the Access to Research initiative. I emailed the Oxfordshire Library Service to ask how it works, and got the following response:


Due to the publishers’ licensing conditions the website can only be accessed through library PCs. We do have special computers in our libraries called Information PCs which don’t require booking and have no time limit on their use so these would be the best way of accessing the site.

We are hoping to get a direct link to Access to Research placed on our website and on the PCs themselves but in the meantime you can open an Internet Explorer page on a library PC and use http://accesstoresearch.pls.org.uk/ to access the site.

Articles may not be saved to memory sticks or other storage devices but can be printed off at a cost of 20p per page.

If you have any further questions about Access to Research please let us know, we’re very excited about this resource being available in libraries!

So, there you have it. If you’re interested in accessing scientific or research papers then pop along to your local library! It’s worth checking what other services they offer, as well, as your library card may give you access to some online resources that you can access from anywhere (I have just discovered that mine gets me back issues of National Geographic and the archives of The Times until 2007).

How do you feed your research habit?

Posted in Blog on Feb 10, 2014 ·

Tag: science

Unless stated, © copyright Emma Cooper, 2005-2014.